Meet Madagascar Alumni Ambassador: Nantenaina Rasolonirina

Madagascar Alumni Ambassador

Madagascar Alumni Ambassador : Nantenaina Rasolonirina

Short Course – Mining Resources: Sustainable Management of Revenue Flows, University of Sydney, 2013

How have your studies in Australia impacted on your organisation?

My Australia Award increased my existing understanding of issues in the mining and petroleum sectors and governance. The knowledge gained also allowed me to introduce new insights in these two sectors. Therefore, I joined the Drafting Committee of the Petroleum Code in order to contribute actively to the improvement of our legal and regulatory framework. The members of the Committee are composed of  representatives of the Office des Mines Nationales et des Industries Stratégiques (OMNIS), the Ministry of Mines and Petroleum, and consultants.

Madagascar Alumni Ambassador Nantenaina Rasolonirina visits the Alcoa Huntly Mine in Western Australia with fellow participants during her Mining Resources Short Course.
Nantenaina Rasolonirina visits the Alcoa Huntly Mine in Western Australia with fellow participants during her Mining Resources Short Course. Photo supplied.

What development issues in Africa are you most concerned about and how are you contributing to addressing these issues?

One of the main development issues in Africa is the governance of natural resources, and I look forward to making a positive difference in the petroleum sector by implementing new ideas through the Petroleum Code and elsewhere by ensuring transfer of knowledge to my peers. I am also strengthening my capacity to make an impact in the sector and interacting with other Australia Awards – Africa Alumni in order to find collaborative solutions.

What was your most memorable experience in Australia?

Since Madagascar is reputed for its endemic biodiversity, I am very sensitive to its protection. What impressed me most in Australia was the possibility of cohabitation between mining exploitation and protected areas. We should all learn more about sustainable development, which combines development and protection.

Why should someone from Madagascar apply for an Australia Award?

I encourage my Malagasy colleagues to apply for an Australia Award because not only does it give international training about a specific sector, but Awardees are also integrated into a supportive community where they can interact with their African peers, who may face the same issues as they do, or with experts who can help them solve these issues during and after the Awards.

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